EAB2017
EAB2017

In December 2017 I did graphic recording at the Ecology Across Borders conference in Ghent, Belgium, organised jointly by the BES, GfÖNecoV, and EEF. It was an assembly of 1500 ecologists from around the world, presenting on an almost overwhelming array of different topics, from evolutionary ecology and species interactions, to conservation science and rewilding, to seasonal ecology and global change impacts. I covered four topic sessions: (1) Conservation Science, (2) Rewilding, (3) Winter Ecology, and (4) People and Nature; and one of the workshops: Ecology is Fun! Designing interactive games for outreach.

Conservation Science: Reintroductions, Restoration & Rewilding
Conservation Science: Reintroductions, Restoration & Rewilding

This topic session, chaired by Johannes Kollmann, featured talks from Eric Higgs (Novel and designed ecosystems); Vicky Temperton (Priority effects in grassland experiments in order to inform ecological restoration); Andreas Schweiger (Remembering the past when planning a wilder future); Andrea Perino (Restore function not state); Keith Kirby (Minimum intervention woodland reserves); Rudy Diggelen (Abiotic factors, microbes, bugs and plants: what they contribute to heathland restoration); Sabine Tischew (Site-preparation for long-term reintroduction success of highly endangered xeric grassland species Jurinea cyanoides); and Jim Harris (Principles and standards in determining effective restoration). 

Rewilding as a Contemporary Conservation Strategy
Rewilding as a Contemporary Conservation Strategy

Chaired by Liesbeth Bakker, his topic session explored some of the ethics, practicalities, and other questions underlying rewilding. Is it effective? Is there a point? Are there ethical considerations? Should we? Should we not? Featuring talks by Jens-Christian Svenning (Broad-scale, long-scale perspectives on trophic rewilding); Ine Dorresteijn (Human-carnivore coexistence in cultural landscapes); Koen Arts (Rewilding through animal reintroduction: conceptual considerations); and Meredith Root-Bernstein (Unexpected ecological effects of a reintroduced species [Lama guanacoe]).

Rewilding as a Contemporary Conservation Strategy
Rewilding as a Contemporary Conservation Strategy

Chaired by Liesbeth Bakker, this topic session explored some of the ethics, practicalities, and other questions underlying rewilding. Is it effective? Is there a point? Are there ethical considerations? Should we? Should we not? Featuring talks by Chris Smit (Rewilding with large herbivores: impacts on biodiversity); Ciska Veen (Rewilding with large herbivores: impact on carbon and nitrogen cycling); and Jamie Lorimer (Rewilding in Europe: who decides and through what processes?).

Ecology is Fun: Designing Interactive Games for Outreach
Ecology is Fun: Designing Interactive Games for Outreach

On day 2 I attended the interactive Ecology is Fun workshop organised by Sara Mynott and Emmanuelle Briolat, which encouraged participants to brainstorm what makes a good communicative game, and ultimately to design one of their own in groups. One of the activities included rolling dice - one of which had a different target audience on each side (e.g. secondary school students, primary school students, families, industry, etc.), and the second of which had different topics to be communicated (e.g. manage invasive species, pollinator decline, consequences of ocean acidification) - and then brainstorming how to design a game communicating that topic to that specific audience.

Ecology is Fun: Designing Interactive Games for Outreach
Ecology is Fun: Designing Interactive Games for Outreach

On day 2 I attended the interactive Ecology is Fun workshop organised by Sara Mynott and Emmanuelle Briolat, which encouraged participants to brainstorm what makes a good communicative game, and ultimately to design one of their own in groups. Some of the games that the groups designed involved gloves that would allow players to simulate plant roots and attempt to access nutrients in the "soil" (a bucket of ping-pong balls); a game that would simulate livestock in a field, which would have players balance profit against spread of disease; and a game which would force players to retreat wisely in response to sea level rise.

Winter Ecology: Expanding the Focus in a Changing World
Winter Ecology: Expanding the Focus in a Changing World

The Winter Ecology talks, chaired by Robert Mills, Bjorn Robroek, and Lilian Rues, were wonderful! The talks explored effects of seasonal change on soil, including their microbiomes, and on vegetation; and looked at the impacts that climate change may have on these frigid ecosystems. Featuring Stef Bokhorst (Belowground responses to changing winter conditions); Hugh Henry (Increased soil frost caused by reduced snow cover as a component of reduced precipitation effects on plant productivity: a multi-site analysis); and Twinkle Solanki (Temperature fluctuations above the snow pack moderate UV-screening and recovery of photosynthetic capacity of Vaccinium vitis-idaea leaves during spring).

Winter Ecology: Expanding the Focus in a Changing World
Winter Ecology: Expanding the Focus in a Changing World

The Winter Ecology talks, chaired by Robert Mills, Bjorn Robroek, and Lilian Rues, were wonderful! The talks explored effects of seasonal change on soil, including their microbiomes, and on vegetation; and looked at the impacts that climate change may have on these frigid ecosystems. Featuring Blume-Werry Gesche (Out of sight, out of mind: should we consider roots in winter ecology studies?); Minna Männistö (Responses of soil bacterial communities to contrasting winter-time snow accumulation in sub-arctic tundra); and Eveline Krab (Linking microbial and soil fauna diversity responses to winter climate change in a greening arctic tundra).

People and Nature (Conservation)
People and Nature (Conservation)

Chaired by Eric Higgs, these talks explored the interaction between humans and nature. Featuring Rebecca Thomas (They are what we eat: how feeding rates and public attitudes have affected red kite [Milvus milvus] diet across the UK following their reintroduction); Gitte Kragh (Are volunteer motivations and wellbeing important for achieving conservation goals?); and Katherine Vande Velde (Have a little faith? Discourses on mangrove conservation and management in Singapore). 

People and Nature (Conservation)
People and Nature (Conservation)

Chaired by Eric Higgs, these talks explored the interaction between humans and nature. Featuring Ugo Arbieu (Social-ecological implications of wolves returning to Germany: quantifying attitudes and understanding their determinants); Evelyn Piña Covarrubias (Interactions of jaguars [Panthera onca] and pumas [Puma concolor] with their prey and humans in the Yucatán Peninsula); and Susanne Vogel (How decisions lead to conflict – The role of foraging trade-offs in elephant crop consumption).

People and Nature (Conservation)
People and Nature (Conservation)

Chaired by Eric Higgs, these talks explored the interaction between humans and nature. Featuring Helen Wheeler (What are the needs for effective pan-arctic wildlife monitoring in complex socio-ecological systems and how well are they being met?); and Matthew Struebig (Tolerating tigers: do local beliefs offset human-wildlife conflicts?)

EAB2017
Conservation Science: Reintroductions, Restoration & Rewilding
Rewilding as a Contemporary Conservation Strategy
Rewilding as a Contemporary Conservation Strategy
Ecology is Fun: Designing Interactive Games for Outreach
Ecology is Fun: Designing Interactive Games for Outreach
Winter Ecology: Expanding the Focus in a Changing World
Winter Ecology: Expanding the Focus in a Changing World
People and Nature (Conservation)
People and Nature (Conservation)
People and Nature (Conservation)
EAB2017

In December 2017 I did graphic recording at the Ecology Across Borders conference in Ghent, Belgium, organised jointly by the BES, GfÖNecoV, and EEF. It was an assembly of 1500 ecologists from around the world, presenting on an almost overwhelming array of different topics, from evolutionary ecology and species interactions, to conservation science and rewilding, to seasonal ecology and global change impacts. I covered four topic sessions: (1) Conservation Science, (2) Rewilding, (3) Winter Ecology, and (4) People and Nature; and one of the workshops: Ecology is Fun! Designing interactive games for outreach.

Conservation Science: Reintroductions, Restoration & Rewilding

This topic session, chaired by Johannes Kollmann, featured talks from Eric Higgs (Novel and designed ecosystems); Vicky Temperton (Priority effects in grassland experiments in order to inform ecological restoration); Andreas Schweiger (Remembering the past when planning a wilder future); Andrea Perino (Restore function not state); Keith Kirby (Minimum intervention woodland reserves); Rudy Diggelen (Abiotic factors, microbes, bugs and plants: what they contribute to heathland restoration); Sabine Tischew (Site-preparation for long-term reintroduction success of highly endangered xeric grassland species Jurinea cyanoides); and Jim Harris (Principles and standards in determining effective restoration). 

Rewilding as a Contemporary Conservation Strategy

Chaired by Liesbeth Bakker, his topic session explored some of the ethics, practicalities, and other questions underlying rewilding. Is it effective? Is there a point? Are there ethical considerations? Should we? Should we not? Featuring talks by Jens-Christian Svenning (Broad-scale, long-scale perspectives on trophic rewilding); Ine Dorresteijn (Human-carnivore coexistence in cultural landscapes); Koen Arts (Rewilding through animal reintroduction: conceptual considerations); and Meredith Root-Bernstein (Unexpected ecological effects of a reintroduced species [Lama guanacoe]).

Rewilding as a Contemporary Conservation Strategy

Chaired by Liesbeth Bakker, this topic session explored some of the ethics, practicalities, and other questions underlying rewilding. Is it effective? Is there a point? Are there ethical considerations? Should we? Should we not? Featuring talks by Chris Smit (Rewilding with large herbivores: impacts on biodiversity); Ciska Veen (Rewilding with large herbivores: impact on carbon and nitrogen cycling); and Jamie Lorimer (Rewilding in Europe: who decides and through what processes?).

Ecology is Fun: Designing Interactive Games for Outreach

On day 2 I attended the interactive Ecology is Fun workshop organised by Sara Mynott and Emmanuelle Briolat, which encouraged participants to brainstorm what makes a good communicative game, and ultimately to design one of their own in groups. One of the activities included rolling dice - one of which had a different target audience on each side (e.g. secondary school students, primary school students, families, industry, etc.), and the second of which had different topics to be communicated (e.g. manage invasive species, pollinator decline, consequences of ocean acidification) - and then brainstorming how to design a game communicating that topic to that specific audience.

Ecology is Fun: Designing Interactive Games for Outreach

On day 2 I attended the interactive Ecology is Fun workshop organised by Sara Mynott and Emmanuelle Briolat, which encouraged participants to brainstorm what makes a good communicative game, and ultimately to design one of their own in groups. Some of the games that the groups designed involved gloves that would allow players to simulate plant roots and attempt to access nutrients in the "soil" (a bucket of ping-pong balls); a game that would simulate livestock in a field, which would have players balance profit against spread of disease; and a game which would force players to retreat wisely in response to sea level rise.

Winter Ecology: Expanding the Focus in a Changing World

The Winter Ecology talks, chaired by Robert Mills, Bjorn Robroek, and Lilian Rues, were wonderful! The talks explored effects of seasonal change on soil, including their microbiomes, and on vegetation; and looked at the impacts that climate change may have on these frigid ecosystems. Featuring Stef Bokhorst (Belowground responses to changing winter conditions); Hugh Henry (Increased soil frost caused by reduced snow cover as a component of reduced precipitation effects on plant productivity: a multi-site analysis); and Twinkle Solanki (Temperature fluctuations above the snow pack moderate UV-screening and recovery of photosynthetic capacity of Vaccinium vitis-idaea leaves during spring).

Winter Ecology: Expanding the Focus in a Changing World

The Winter Ecology talks, chaired by Robert Mills, Bjorn Robroek, and Lilian Rues, were wonderful! The talks explored effects of seasonal change on soil, including their microbiomes, and on vegetation; and looked at the impacts that climate change may have on these frigid ecosystems. Featuring Blume-Werry Gesche (Out of sight, out of mind: should we consider roots in winter ecology studies?); Minna Männistö (Responses of soil bacterial communities to contrasting winter-time snow accumulation in sub-arctic tundra); and Eveline Krab (Linking microbial and soil fauna diversity responses to winter climate change in a greening arctic tundra).

People and Nature (Conservation)

Chaired by Eric Higgs, these talks explored the interaction between humans and nature. Featuring Rebecca Thomas (They are what we eat: how feeding rates and public attitudes have affected red kite [Milvus milvus] diet across the UK following their reintroduction); Gitte Kragh (Are volunteer motivations and wellbeing important for achieving conservation goals?); and Katherine Vande Velde (Have a little faith? Discourses on mangrove conservation and management in Singapore). 

People and Nature (Conservation)

Chaired by Eric Higgs, these talks explored the interaction between humans and nature. Featuring Ugo Arbieu (Social-ecological implications of wolves returning to Germany: quantifying attitudes and understanding their determinants); Evelyn Piña Covarrubias (Interactions of jaguars [Panthera onca] and pumas [Puma concolor] with their prey and humans in the Yucatán Peninsula); and Susanne Vogel (How decisions lead to conflict – The role of foraging trade-offs in elephant crop consumption).

People and Nature (Conservation)

Chaired by Eric Higgs, these talks explored the interaction between humans and nature. Featuring Helen Wheeler (What are the needs for effective pan-arctic wildlife monitoring in complex socio-ecological systems and how well are they being met?); and Matthew Struebig (Tolerating tigers: do local beliefs offset human-wildlife conflicts?)

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